Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Annual Holiday Gathering

Remember to click on post to enlarge.....



Thursday, November 10, 2016

AIS Documentary to Air Tomorrow Friday Nov. 11,2016


From: Steph Boismenue <sboismenue@co.oneida.wi.us>
Date: November 10, 2016 at 2:38:36 PM CST
Subject: AIS Documentary to Air Tomorrow
Good Afternoon All,
I wanted to share with you a fantastic documentary that will be airing tomorrow:
Making Waves: Battle for the Great Lakes, a two-hour documentary about the effects of aquatic invasive species in the Great Lakes and the efforts under way to control and prevent them. Friday, Nov. 11, from 12-2:00 P.M., on WNMU-TV, in the Upper Peninsula and parts of Northeastern Wisconsin.  It can be seen on public TV channel 13 or through various cable providers (channel number will vary).
Two years ago, Michele Sadauskas (County Conservationist) and I were included in the filming of this documentary and it’s finally here. I hope you will be able to see it or set your DVR’s – you won’t want to miss this.
Enjoy,
Steph

Stephanie Boismenue
Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator
Oneida County Land & Water Conservation Department
Oneida County Courthouse, 2nd floor
PO Box 400
Rhinelander, WI 54501
Phone:  715-369-7835    
Fax:  715-369-6268
sboismenue@co.oneida.wi.us

Monday, September 26, 2016

Digging Out Purple Loosestrife

The DNR helps out  along with Paul Schrieber, digging out Purple Loosestrife, an invasive species, in front of  Weinburgers  at Norwood this summer. The close-up flower below is the replacement planting of the Non-invasive Pickerel Weed.  









Wednesday, September 21, 2016

CBCW Grant Changes in 2017

From: Steph Boismenue <sboismenue@co.oneida.wi.us>
Date: September 20, 2016 at 9:54:40 AM CDT
Subject: CBCW Grant Changes in 2017
Good Morning,
If you are applying for a CBCW grant in 2017 please see the attached fact sheet which will tell you everything you need to know about the changes in 2017. 
Please share with your cities, towns, villages, counties, tribes, lake protection and rehabilitation districts, qualified lake associations, qualified river management organizations, and qualified nonprofit organizations who may be eligible to apply. Other eligible sponsors include private and public colleges, universities, technical schools, state and federal natural resource or land management agencies and FERC-licensed hydroelectric corporations.
More information about the grant can be found at:  http://dnr.wi.gov/Aid/SurfaceWater.html

Stephanie Boismenue
Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator
Oneida County Land & Water Conservation Department
Oneida County Courthouse, 2nd floor
PO Box 400
Rhinelander, WI 54501
Phone:  715-369-7835    
Fax:  715-369-6268
sboismenue@co.oneida.wi.us





Clean Boats Clean Waters (CBCW)
Aquatic Invasive Species Control Grant Program
Clean Boats Clean Waters is an aquatic invasive species (AIS) prevention subprogram through which volunteer or paid staff conduct boat and trailer inspections and educate boaters on how to prevent the spread of AIS at boat landings. CBCW grants provide funding to eligible sponsors to help with the cost of running a CBCW program that helps prevent the introduction of aquatic invasive species in Wisconsin’s surface waters or limits the spread of aquatic invasive species that may already be present.
New in 2017 is the ability to pair two boat landings, allowing the minimum 200 hours of inspection time to be split between two landings. Or you can continue to implement the full 200 hours at just one landing. There is also a limit on the number of landings that can be funded under one grant. Read on for more details.
What’s Changed?
Inspection time (200 hours) can now be used at a pair of landings, either on the same lake or on two different lakes. Or you can spend the entire 200 hours of inspection time at one landing. One grant application can target up to 6 individual landings or up to 6 pairs of landings, or a combination of single and paired landings not to exceed 12 landings total.
Who May Apply?
Cities, towns, villages, counties, tribes, lake protection and rehabilitation districts, qualified lake associations, qualified river management organizations, and qualified nonprofit organizations are eligible to apply. Other eligible sponsors include private and public colleges, universities, technical schools, state and federal natural resource or land management agencies and FERC-licensed hydroelectric corporations.
What Cost Sharing is Available?
Grant funding is available for 75% of project costs up to a maximum of $4,000 per boat landing or pair of landings. The remaining 25% of the project cost must come from the project sponsor in the form of cash, donated labor or services, or “in-kind” items. These grants are reimbursement grants; all costs must first be paid by project sponsor before reimbursement can be requested from the DNR. A 25% advance payment will be provided to help get the project started.
What Project Activities are Eligible?
Activities eligible for CBCW funding include all of the following (also found in the Clean Boats, Clean Waters Program Guidelines):
1. Inspectors that have attended a training workshop and received program materials.
2. Trained inspectors deployed at boat launch sites to conduct inspections, collect and report data, provide boater education and report suspect specimens.
3. A minimum of 200 annual hours of watercraft inspection per boat landing OR at two landings during weekends, holidays, fishing tournaments and other special events between May 1 and October 30.
4. Data collected is reported through the statewide watercraft inspection data base (SWIMS) and must be entered into SWIMS by the project sponsor.
When are Applications Due?
Applications are due December 10th. We prefer that applications be submitted electronically, but applications can also be mailed, postmarked by December 10. Incomplete applications will not be funded and will be returned to the applicant. Application forms and guidance about the CBCW grants can be found at: http://dnr.wi.gov/lakes/cbcw/
New For 2017
Clean Boats Clean Waters – Aquatic Invasive Species Control Grant Program Page 2
What Time Period Do the Grants Cover?
CBCW grants have a start date of February 15 and end date of December 31 of the same year. Project costs incurred prior to the start date or after the end date are not eligible for reimbursement.
How it Works…The Application:
Applications and grant agreement have been rolled into one document. By signing page 2 of the Clean Boats Clean Waters Funding Request and Agreement form, you are both requesting funds and agreeing to grant conditions. Requests for funding may be submitted electronically or can be mailed to DNR (contact at right).
Your application will be reviewed and if everything meets the CBCW program requirements, the DNR will complete and sign the grant agreement. A copy of the completed grant agreement will be returned to you and an advance payment will automatically be processed and mailed to the address in the application.
How it Works…Project Implementation:
Your CBCW landing inspection program includes landing inspector training, speaking with and educating boat launch users, conducting inspections, and collecting data to complete the Watercraft Inspection Report form. The project sponsor must enter CBCW data for the inspection season into the DNR SWIMS database.
How it Works…Final Reporting & Final Payment:
When data entry into SWIMS is completed, the project sponsor should complete a Grant Payment Request and a Grant Payment Worksheet. All project expenses and any donations, including the total of all volunteer time, must be listed on the worksheet. The completed forms are submitted to address below.
The SWIMS data base will be checked to see that staff and volunteer time claimed on the worksheet matches the data entered. The DNR will then complete final payment and a check reimbursing project expenses will be mailed to the project sponsor at address in the application.
DNR CBCW Contact
Send your completed grant application, reimbursement request, and any questions to:
1- Jane Malischke
DNR Environmental Grant Specialist
810 W. Maple St.
Spooner WI 54801
(715) 635-4062
Jane.Malischke@wisconsin.gov
2- DNR Web Site http://dnr.wi.gov/lakes/cbcw

Monday, September 12, 2016

Lakes in Action

From: Steph Boismenue <sboismenue@co.oneida.wi.us>
Date: September 9, 2016 at 12:38:34 PM CDT
Subject: Workshop: Lakes in Action: Advocacy 101
Good Afternoon,
Here is a great opportunity to learn how you and your lake group or organization can be more effective advocates for sound water policy.

Lakes In Action: Advocacy 101 (Rhinelander)
Presented by Wisconsin Lakes & River Alliance of Wisconsin
When:  Thursday, September 22, 2016   5 PM - 8 PM
Where: Holiday Acres Resort, 4060 South Shore Drive, Rhinelander, WI  54501    http://www.holidayacres.com
~Registration is FREE, but space is limited~

Wish you could influence public policy makers to be more protective of our lakes and waters, instead of tearing down existing protections? You can!  Wisconsin Lakes and the River Alliance of Wisconsin have partnered to create “Lakes in Action”, a new program designed to help you and your lake organization be even more effective in advocating sound water policy at all levels of government.
To launch Lakes in Action this fall, we’re offering a free workshop to teach you the basics of being a good advocate - as an individual and an organization. Using the recent dismantling of Wisconsin’s shoreland zoning law as a real world topic from which to work, we’ll cover topics such as:
·         What can my lake organization do under the law to influence lawmakers? Can my group do lobbying
·         What are the best ways to communicate and build effective relationships with lawmakers?
·         How can I have an impact and advocate for my lake if my voting address is different from my lake home?
·         How do we build consensus within our own organization as to the group's position on an issue, or even whether to advocate one way or another as a group?
The training, presented by staff from WI Lakes and the River Alliance, will run 3 hours and are free, but registration is required.
Click here to register for the Rhinelander workshop   https://www3.thedatabank.com/dpg/307/personal2.asp?formid=EventsNoGuests&c=6648760

Steph
Stephanie Boismenue
Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator
Oneida County Land & Water Conservation Department
Oneida County Courthouse, 2nd floor
PO Box 400
Rhinelander, WI 54501
Phone:  715-369-7835    
Fax:  715-369-6268
sboismenue@co.oneida.wi.us


Thursday, September 8, 2016

What's Happening in Conservation?

From: Michele Sadauskas <msadauskas@co.oneida.wi.us>
Date: September 8, 2016 at 1:34:01 PM CDT
Subject: Conservation Clip List
Good afternoon everyone-

Did you know that baby oysters are called spat?  That L.A. is looking to build a land bridge over a 10 lane highway and you can watch a time lapse video of the proposed wildlife corridor?  And that it took only one tidal cycle after riprap and concrete slab were removed from a river shoreline to see a brand new beach appear?

Check out the below links to find out more what is happening across our country in the world of Conservation.  Enjoy!

Conservation Clip List is a weekly collection of articles distributed by NACD that provides our members and partners with the latest news in what's driving conservation. If you have a relevant submission, please contact your NACD Communications Team.

If Minnesotans want to spray neonics on plants, for instance, they now need to go through an additional step, verifying that the pesticides are needed. The state's Department of Agriculture also will increase inspections and enforcement efforts to make sure that any pesticides that are highly toxic to bees — including neonics — are being used according to regulations.
More than 2,000 mountain whitefish have been found dead along the banks of the river, but officials estimate about 20,000 more whitefish are presumed to have been killed by the parasite.
The announcement Wednesday will call for accelerating field-scale research in three states to reduce fertilizer runoff and groundwater pumping for irrigation. The participants also will create case studies so that farmers, crop consultants and ag retailers can learn what conservation measures make economic as well as ecological sense in particular geographic areas.
Growing barley as feed isn't anything new, but Daccarett sprouts barley seeds inside shipping containers using hydroponic technology and indoor grow lights. He's using just 2 percent of the water it would take to grow the crop outside.
The dead worker bees littering the farms signaled the killer was less mysterious, but no less devastating. The pattern matched acute pesticide poisoning. By one estimate, at a single apiary — Flowertown Bee Farm and Supply, in Summerville — 46 hives died on the spot, totaling about 2.5 million bees.
The mountain lion population in the Santa Monica Mountains is still relatively healthy but has the lowest documented genetic diversity of any puma population, aside from Florida’s panthers. Scientists now have a chance to tackle the main threat to the big cats’ survival: isolation.
In the drought-prone West, where every drop of water counts, California farmers are in a constant search for ways to efficiently use the increasingly scarce resource. Cannon Michael is putting drone technology to work on his fields at Bowles Farming Co. near Los Banos, 120 miles southeast of San Francisco.
An $800,000 federal grant from NOAA will be used to plant one and a half billion oyster spat over the next three years. The more oysters survive, the healthier the bay becomes. The NOAA grant stipulates the oysters are to be planted in protected sanctuaries, currently off limits to harvesting.
(Opinion) It will be impossible to control the rising costs, damages and dangers related to home development on fire-prone lands unless we get the incentives right. Ideally, towns and cities should be rewarded when they allow building to go forward in a fire-safe fashion, and they should be forced, financially, to think twice before approving any new housing developments on dangerous lands.
The old armor had been keeping fine sands and woody debris suspended by wave action, preventing natural beach formation. The new beach is prime spawning habitat for surf smelt and ideal for forage fish, Shaffer said. But even the experts were surprised by how quickly the beach was transformed and the shorebirds and otters returned.
Cloud Peak literally moved a mountain, which is an expensive proposition. In Wyoming alone, what has already been mined is expected to cost more than $2 billion to clean up. And moving mountains back into place is just part of the cost. The rest is rebuilding an entire ecosystem. Jones says that starts with the plants.

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Michele Sadauskas
County Conservationist
Oneida County Land & Water Conservation
Oneida County Courthouse, 2nd floor
PO Box 400
Rhinelander, WI 54501
Phone:  715-369-7835    
Fax:  715-369-6268
msadauskas@co.oneida.wi.us